Qwalsius

Peter Pan, Indians and Neverland

shaun petersonComment

Today I went to see Pan, Disney's latest rendition of the classic tale written by J. M. Barrie in 1904 reworked time over again and again and in this time of great political correctness many a Native activist paid much mind to it's release. This version directed by Joe Wright takes a unique take from the first 15min wherein the use of Nirvana's Smells Like Teen Spirit and onto the use of the Ramones Blitzkieg Bop the continuity of that dissipates no other modern tunes come into being after those scenes and so it loses a sense of consistency.

I will credit Disney for going away with the fantasy tribe and poor taste of the original animated Peter Pan which brought us the greatly offensive "what makes the red man red" song from that great old time when it was perfectly alright to push non Euro-American's into propaganda and stereotypes that elevated the esteem of the day. In the notable advocate against Native appropriation authority Adrienne Keene had cited, it's better we are absent in film than to be vilified or glorified, that's my simplified version of her gist.

the original Tigerlilly that suggests Native women are freely giving to be with non-Indians dancing atop a big drum which a real Native woman would ever do and if you don't believe me, just ask.

the original Tigerlilly that suggests Native women are freely giving to be with non-Indians dancing atop a big drum which a real Native woman would ever do and if you don't believe me, just ask.

 

I believe this to be true. On my recent trip to the Czech Republic for the 2nd time I again came up against the notion that I am not Native because I do not look like images of those shown around the world, and what are those exactly but images created largely in fiction of white actors, wearing make up and wigs dressed in clothing that at best resembled a compilation of tribes. The truth is not many care or say, get over it, or you lost the war but I've really never heard anyone tell me the war thing to my face. And yet as Americans we are told 'never forget'... the Alamo, Pearl Harbor, 911, all of which take place after our loss and continued striving for the promises granted in the settling of these lands.

This happened because America as it was founded made us one obsolete inferior race. We were not human beings to the new world, to this day when the fourth of July comes, radio waves still call us savages. So when the declaration stands to state all men are created equal, well except, blacks, asians, latinos and above all the native savages.

Back to the topic of the movie though itself. Like I said, I"m glad we are absent in it replaced by a mythical multicultural tribe. Back at that time of these successful writers, Native America was Neverland a place of fascination and wonder, but to the world never understood.

Today in parts of Europe, there are large numbers of people who study aspects of mostly Lakota culture and emulate it to a fanatical degree. The problem is Native America is comprised of more than 600 tribes, some which have fallen but nonetheless share the complexity and diversity of European culture. I tell friends often it's like asking an woman of Iceland to speak Spanish or a German to tell you Italian histories and traditions. Our land is vast.

Ok, again back to the movie, the characters were forced, relationships left at the editing floor and Hook a sad attempt at a young Harrison Ford/Indiana Jones. The pace if off and the villains oversold. Climax tensions of action only tool hold of me for one scene when Peter flies and then, that's about it. My recommendation for this movie and my ranting that makes little sense to most, well I'd say Netflix.